Press

Below are reviews and articles that have been made available in printed media or in an on-line format.
The postings consist of transcribed content from other sites or links to the original sites.
I have made every attempt to gain permission to reproduce the articles and reviews displayed below.
If you are the original source of this material and have a query about it’s inclusion please contact me.
An unbiased approach is taken with all press stories and reviews.


The first review of Spoof or Die

Author – Andrew Robertson

Source – eyeforfilm.co.uk

Summary

The mural says “you are in Loyalist East Belfast” but we aren’t – those days are gone.
Not enough for Craig, however, Craig who’s heard stories, stories that have gone to his head.
His father works in “security” and his uncle hints at bigger things.

He’s got no friends though, is bullied at bus-stops – he’s out of time,
in a sense, hoping for a return to some-when that was never a golden age.
He’s played by Ryan McParland; it’s a kinetic and compelling turn. He’s all angst and rage,
and things don’t seem to be changing. That’s when he meets Nicky (Yasmin Paige) last seen in Submarine –
she’s moved over from England, and without Craig’s romanticised history she’s convinced this town is a hole –
“This place is rubbish apart from the big Top Shop”

continued…

Link to original article here.


Pramface’s Sean Verey Talks to Sugarscape!

Author – lizziecox23

Source – sugarscape.com

Summary

Here at Sugarscape, we loved BBC3 comedy-drama Pramface which follows the lives of two teenagers as they are forced to deal with an unplanned pregnancy after a disastrous one-night stand.

So you can imagine that we were a little bit excited to chat to the star of the show Sean Verey who plays Jamie, the 16 year old lad who loses his virginity and conceives a baby all in one night.

Link to original article here.


Richard Ayoade: Hidden depths of the bashful filmmaker

Author – David Gritten

Source – telegraph.co.uk

Summary

Until now, Richard Ayoade’s brushes with fame have consisted of becoming a distinctive presence in niche late-evening TV comedies . He played the hapless graphic designer Ned Smanks in Nathan Barley, the terminally geeky Moss in The IT Crowd, and co-created and appeared in the spoof horror series Garth Marenghi’s Darkplace.

Once seen, it’s fair to say, Ayoade is not easily forgotten. Born to a Nigerian father and a Norwegian mother, he is very tall and slender, with large horn-rimmed glasses, a facial expression that shifts between fretful and plaintive, and a shock of hair that is heroically unruly.

Link to original article here.


Interview: Craig Roberts and Yasmin Paige

Author – Emma Hurwitz

Source – idolmag.co.uk

Summary

Craig Roberts and Yasmin Paige are fast becoming labelled as the ones to watch. Wowing critics at Sundance and Toronto film festivals as Oliver and Jordana in the year’s stand-out debut, Submarine. Deadpan and charmingly awkward, Craig and Yasmin feel like a new type of star, fresh, on the cusp of success and completely unassuming. Having previously had bit parts on various TV shows, Submarine is their launch pad to success. However genuinely modest and overwhelmed, they aren’t pinning their hopes on Hollywood, no more than a small part in the next Richard Ayoade film. They chat to IDOL about success, Eminem and the genius of Kenan and Kel.

Link to original article here.


Review: Pramface

Author – Emily Cawse

Source – intermissionbristol.co.uk

Summary

BBC Three’s latest sit com shows us the lighter side of… Teenage pregnancy? Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, and Pregnancy – As the teenage pupil of an all-girls grammar, this was the dreaded list of Sexually Transmitted Disasters that could befall any unsuspecting female who hadn’t been expertly trained by their cucumber-wielding biology teacher. With pregnancy, you got more than just a course of antibiotics – you got baby. A real, live, miniature human being: a barrier to higher education; a direct cause of cellulite; a parasite living inside your tummy until it emerged, nine months later, in a tempest of pain, crying and bodily fluids. These lessons were so powerful, I still can’t go within a hundred yards of a unisex swimming pool. Can I ever bring myself to laugh at pregnancy?

Link to original article here.




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